Vos says Jan. 6 committee wants to talk to him about phone calls with Trump

MADISON, Wis. — Wisconsin Assembly Speaker Robin Vos is fighting a subpoena from the U.S. House of Representatives’ Jan. 6 committee to testify about a phone call he received from former President Donald Trump over the summer.

Vos filed a lawsuit over the weekend to block a subpoena seeking a deposition in front of the committee, which wants to learn more about what was said when Trump called Vos in July about efforts to decertify the 2020 election.

RELATED: Wisconsin assembly speaker says Trump called him this month to decertify 2020 election

According to the subpoena, Vos was scheduled to give a deposition on September 26 at 10 a.m. either at the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. or by videoconference. The deposition has since been canceled, but the subpoena still remains, according to the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel.

Vos’ suit argues the subpoena places an undue burden on the Speaker and infringes on his legislative immunity from civil process.

The lawsuit also argues the subpoena was “issued from an unlawful Committee” and accuses the committee of issuing the subpoena in order to get testimony from Vos ahead of the next televised hearing on September 28, “so that clips can be edited out to be used in a multimedia show.”

Vos’ suit also asserts that his conversation with Trump is irrelevant to the committee’s investigation because it did not have anything to do with the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol.

Vos told Milwaukee television station WISN over the summer that Trump wanted Wisconsin to “do something different” to decertify the results of the 2020 presidential election, which multiple recounts and court decisions confirmed was won by President Joe Biden. The call came shortly after the Wisconsin State Supreme Court outlawed the use of ballot drop boxes — which were used in the 2020 election — going forward.

Vos said he explained to the former president that the decision blocked the drop boxes from being used in upcoming elections, but did not allow Republicans in Wisconsin to decertify the 2020 results.

“I explained it’s not allowed under the Constitution. He has a different opinion,” Vos said at the time.

In a statement to News 3 Now Monday, Vos said he was surprised to receive a subpoena.

“My conversation with former President Trump took place many months after January 6th,” Vos said. “Given how close we are to the midterms, this subpoena seems to be more about partisan politics than actual fact-finding.”

Vos reasserted that his call with Trump is protected by the Constitution.

“In light of the clear political nature of this request, we intend to go to court to fight for the immunity given to state leaders under these circumstances,” Vos said.

Vos’ full statement can be found below.

“I was surprised to receive a subpoena since I have no information to provide about the events surrounding January 6th.

My conversation with former President Trump took place many months after January 6th and has been about his concerns regarding issues in Wisconsin with the way the 2020 election was handled, a fact that has been publicly documented on numerous occasions in the media.

Given how close we are to the midterms, this subpoena seems to be more about partisan politics than actual fact-finding.

The Constitution protects these sorts of communications, and in light of the clear political nature of this request, we intend to go to court to fight for the immunity given to state leaders under these circumstances.”