artificial intelligence

Government uses Siri, Alexa to stop spread of census misinformation

As the United States government gears up for its 2020 census, it's working closely with large tech companies to get ahead of potential malicious campaigns looking to exploit their platforms to deter people, including minorities, from taking part in the once-a-decade event. The Census Bureau is going so far as to consider how voice assistants, such as Apple's Siri and Amazon's Alexa, could be used to spread misinformation.

Dems deepfake chairman to highlight 2020 concerns

The Democratic National Committee wanted to demonstrate the potential threat to the 2020 election posed by deepfake videos — clips created with artificial intelligence that can make people appear to do or say things they never did. So the committee came up with a novel solution: It had experts make one, with its chair as the victim.

A bot can now beat poker pros at six-player Texas Hold 'Em

Trevor Savage has played poker professionally for 15 years, winning millions of dollars in the process. While he typically takes on humans, he faced a daunting new opponent in June: a powerful bot developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Facebook AI Research to trounce the world's top players.

AI can learn how a pizza is assembled

Even a toddler can figure out the right way to put together a pizza: you roll out the dough, add some sauce, sprinkle on cheese, put the toppings on, then pop the whole thing in the oven.

Computer hobbyists use AI to create deepfakes

By day, Paul Shales is a computer programmer who works in advertising operations for a bank. By night, he's creating videos that show Elon Musk as a creepy looking, giggly baby; President Donald Trump as a temperamental pageant contestant on "Toddlers & Tiaras"; and Kim Kardashian freestyle rapping.

Elon Musk disagrees that lidar is critical for self-driving cars

For most people building self-driving cars, lidar is viewed as a godsend. In recent years, enthusiasm for the technology has sparked shortages of the depth-measuring sensor, acquisitions of startups developing it and more than a billion dollars of investments.

Germany wants access to citizens' data, sparking new fears

A hidden audio recorder built to fit inside a bedroom door. A tiny camera stashed in a garden birdhouse. Secret odour-samplers embedded into living rooms sofa to collect signature body scents, to be stored for future use so sniffer dogs can track surveillance targets.