Marshfield’s example of a bipartisan approach to getting politics back on track

Marshfield’s example of a bipartisan approach to getting politics back on track

There are so few examples of genuine, nonpartisan, civil discourse these days that the rare opportunity to participate sticks out like a sore thumb.

Madison had a series of very grass-roots, citizen-initiated conversations a year or so ago. But the nature of this week’s nonpartisan public dialogue at the UW-Marshfield Wood County Campus is striking in its scope.

The Marshfield Civility Project is sponsored by both the Republican and Democratic parties of Wood County, the Marshfield Area Community Foundation and the Wisconsin Institute for Public Policy and Services.

It uses the excellent National Issues Forum Issue Guide “How Do We Get American Politics Back on Track,” as a conversation starter on the topic of civility in politics. It’s designed to get people talking, listening and thinking rationally and civilly, disagreeing respectfully and maybe even agreeing a little more.

Journalist colleagues in Wausau tell us the project has drawn attention and is having an influence on citizen behavior in that area. It’s an interesting model that deserves being paid attention to, and in all likelihood, replicating.