Health

Ukrainian minister says Russia blocking access to medicines

Ukraine’s health minister has accused Russian authorities of committing a crime against humanity by blocking access to affordable medicines in areas its forces have occupied since invading the country 5 1/2 months ago. In an interview with The Associated Press, Ukrainian Health Minister Viktor Liashko said Russian authorities repeatedly have blocked efforts to provide state-subsidized drugs to people in occupied cities, towns and villages. The World Health Organization says it recorded 445 attacks on Ukrainian hospitals and other health care facilities as of Aug. 11 that directly resulted in 86 deaths and 105 injuries. But Liashko said the much higher number of casualties caused by damaged roads and bridges delaying ambulances “cannot be calculated.”

Len Dawson, MVP of Chiefs' first Super Bowl win, in hospice

Len Dawson, the 87-year-old Hall of Fame quarterback who led the Kansas City Chiefs to their first Super Bowl title, has entered hospice care in Kansas City. KMBC-TV, the Kansas City station where Dawson began his broadcasting career in 1966, confirmed Dawson is in hospice care through his wife, Linda. The MVP of the Chiefs’ 23-7 Super Bowl victory over Minnesota in January 1970, Dawson was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1987 and received the Pete Rozelle Radio-Television Award in 2012. In addition to his work at KMBC where he was the station’s first sports anchor, Dawson was a game analyst for NBC and the Chiefs’ radio network and hosted HBO’s “Inside the NFL” show.

Idaho Supreme Court won't block strict abortion bans

The Idaho Supreme Court says Idaho’s strict abortion bans will be allowed to take effect while legal challenges play out in court. The state's highest court made the ruling late Friday afternoon. A doctor and a regional Planned Parenthood affiliate sued the state earlier this year over three anti-abortion laws, all of which were designed to take effect this year now that the U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade. Under the new ruling, a near-total criminalizing all abortions takes effect Aug. 25. The law says anyone performing or assisting with an abortion may be charged with a felony, but physicians can attempt to defend themselves by saying the procedure was necessary to save a life.

Judds asks court to seal report of death investigation

The family of country singer Naomi Judd filed an amended court petition to seal police reports and recordings made during the investigation into her death. The family said Friday the records contain video and audio interviews with relatives in the immediate aftermath of her death and releasing such details would inflict "significant trauma and irreparable harm.” Judd died at the age of 76 on April 30 at her home in Tennessee. The court filing also included details about how Ashley Judd found her mother alive after she shot herself. Ashley stayed by her mother’s side for 30 minutes until help arrived.

Kansas to recount abortion vote by hand, despite big margin

Kansas’ elections director says the state will go along with a request for a hand recount of votes from every county after last week’s decisive statewide vote affirming abortion rights, even though there was a 165,000-vote difference and a recount won’t change the result. Melissa Leavitt, of Colby, declined to comment to reporters Friday evening about her request for a recount. Kansas law requires her to put up a bond to cover the cost. Also seeking a recount is state Sen. Caryn Tyson, who is trailing state Rep. Steven Johnson in the Republican primary for state treasurer by about 400 votes out of nearly 434,000 cast. She is asking for a hand recount in about half the state’s 105 counties.

In Biden's big bill: Climate, health care, deficit reduction

The biggest investment ever in the U.S. to fight climate change. A hard-fought cap on out-of-pocket prescription drug costs for people in the Medicare program. A new corporate minimum tax to ensure big businesses pay their share. And billions leftover to pay down federal deficits. All told, the Democrats’ “Inflation Reduction Act” may not do much to immediately tame inflationary price hikes. But the package approved by Congress and headed to the White House for President Joe Biden’s signature will touch countless American lives with longtime party proposals. Here's a look at what's in the estimated $740 billion economic package.

Congress OKs Dems' climate, health bill, a Biden triumph

Democrats have pushed their landmark climate and health care bill through Congress, handing an election-year victory to President Joe Biden. The House approved the bill over solid Republican opposition Friday, five days after the Senate did the same. The vote means a win for Biden that until late July seemed out of reach. The package is much smaller than Biden's original environment and social legislation that failed in Congress last year. But after long, bitter talks, Democrats agreed to a smaller but still substantive compromise. It includes Washington's biggest ever effort on climate change, pharmaceutical price curbs and tax boosts on big corporations, long-held party goals.

Vikings' Cousins has COVID-19, won't play preseason opener

Minnesota Vikings quarterback Kirk Cousins has tested positive for COVID-19 and won't play in the team’s first preseason game. Coach Kevin O’Connell confirmed the diagnosis at practice. Cousins was absent for a second straight day after feeling ill and being sent home. Cousins has “very minimal” symptoms, according to O’Connell. Sean Mannion and Kellen Mond will split time in the exhibition Sunday at Las Vegas. Cousins was unlikely to play much if at all if he wasn’t sick. There are no other quarterbacks on the roster.

Inflation Reduction Act may have little impact on inflation

With inflation raging near its highest level in four decades, the House gave final approval to President Joe Biden’s landmark Inflation Reduction Act. Its title raises a tantalizing question: Will the measure actually do what it says? Economic analyses suggest that the answer is likely no — not anytime soon, anyway. The legislation, which now heads to the White House for Biden's signature, won’t directly address some of the main drivers of surging prices — from gas and food to rents and restaurant meals. Still, over time, the bill could save money for some Americans by lessening the cost of certain prescription drugs for the elderly, extending health insurance subsidies and reducing energy prices.

Most Women With Lung Cancer Report Sexual Dysfunction

FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Sexual dysfunction is common in women with lung cancer, according to a study presented at the annual International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer World Conference on Lung Cancer, held from Aug. 6 to 9 in Vienna.

Poliovirus Discovered in NYC Wastewater

FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- State and local health officials have detected the poliovirus in New York City's wastewater, a finding that indicates the virus has spread widely since first being discovered in the wastewater of a neighboring county last month.

Poliovirus Discovered in NYC Wastewater

FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- State and local health officials have detected the poliovirus in New York City's wastewater, a finding that indicates the virus has spread widely since first being discovered in the wastewater of a neighboring county last month.

FDA: Common Diabetes Drug Januvia May Contain Traces of Carcinogen

FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The popular diabetes drug Januvia may contain traces of a probable carcinogen, but patients should keep using the medication because it could be dangerous to stop taking it, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced this week.