Here’s where Wisconsin senators stand on the Kavanaugh vote

Here’s where Wisconsin senators stand on the Kavanaugh vote
Ron Johnson and Tammy Baldwin

Wisconsin’s two U.S. senators plan to cast opposing votes on whether or not to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh as the next Supreme Court Justice.

U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson said he plans to vote in favor of Kavanaugh. In a statement Thursday, he called the judge a “highly qualified jurist” who has led an “exemplary adult life.”

“The uncorroborated allegations against him as a youth — revealed only at the end of the confirmation process — do not overcome the presumption of innocence or detract from Judge Kavanaugh’s lifetime of dedicated public service,” Johnson said in the statement.

U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin said she is not convinced that Kavanaugh would serve as a “fair, impartial and independent Supreme Court Justice.” In a statement Thursday, Baldwin implied that she would not vote to have Kavanaugh serve in the highest court.

“It is clear to me that the White House and Senate Republicans stood in the way of a full investigation of the credible allegations against this Supreme Court nominee by not allowing the FBI to interview Dr. Blasey Ford, Judge Kavanaugh and a number of witnesses who came forward publicly,” Baldwin said in the statement.

Kavanaugh is President Donald Trump’s pick for the Supreme Court. He has served on the United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit for more than 12 years. The full Senate is expected to vote on Kavanaugh over the weekend.

Following are the full statements from both U.S. senators:

Tammy Baldwin

It is clear to me that the White House and Senate Republicans stood in the way of a full investigation of the credible allegations against this Supreme Court nominee by not allowing the FBI to interview Dr. Blasey Ford, Judge Kavanaugh and a number of witnesses who came forward publicly. My concerns that Judge Kavanaugh was hand-picked by powerful special interests and that he would overturn the law of the land on health care for people with pre-existing conditions and women’s reproductive health have not changed. I am still not convinced that Judge Kavanaugh would serve as a fair, impartial and independent Supreme Court Justice.

Ron Johnson

The presumption of innocence is the bedrock principle of America’s system of justice. By all accounts, Judge Kavanaugh is a highly qualified jurist and has led an exemplary adult life as a husband, father, and member of his church and community. The uncorroborated allegations against him as a youth — revealed only at the end of the confirmation process — do not overcome the presumption of innocence or detract from Judge Kavanaugh’s lifetime of dedicated public service. That is why, having reviewed his lifetime of achievement — and having spent an additional five hours reviewing the supplemental FBI report — I will vote to confirm Judge Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.