Here’s how Wisconsin’s House members would have voted on the health care bill

One Republican said he would have voted 'no'

Wondering how members of Wisconsin’s congressional delegation would have voted on the American Health Care Act, the GOP replacement bill for Obamacare?

News 3 did the research to find out their positions both before and after the vote was pulled from the floor by U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan.

Here’s how Wisconsin’s House members would have voted on the health care bill

YES VOTES:

Ryan was, of course, going to vote for the bill he helped to promote. At the news conference Friday afternoon, Ryan said the house had “come up short” on the measure but he still was proud of the bill.

“It would make a dramatic improvement in our health care system and provide relief by people hurting under Obamacare,” Ryan said.

Ryan was joined by other House Republicans from Wisconsin, but not all of them.

Here’s how Wisconsin’s House members would have voted on the health care bill

Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, of the 5th Congressional District said in a statement Thursday that he would vote for the bill .

“The Republican alternative introduced earlier this month is a positive first step toward a free-market solution that works for the people, not government,” Sensenbrenner said in the press release.

Here’s how Wisconsin’s House members would have voted on the health care bill

Rep. Glenn Grothman, of the 6th Congressional District, also said he would support the measure. In an interview with News 3, Grothman said he thought the bill made the health care system better, and also wanted to see a vote held so the public knew where members of Congress stood.

“If it’s going to go down, it shouldn’t go down behind the scenes with the speaker counting votes in his office and nobody knows who kept Obamacare going,” Grothman said. “If Obamacare is going to keep on going another six months or a year, we ought to know who is responsible.”

Here’s how Wisconsin’s House members would have voted on the health care bill

Rep. Sean Duffy, of the 7th Congressional District, told News 3 he also intended to vote for the American Health Care Act Friday afternoon.

“This system isn’t working, but if this doesn’t pass today we will be left with the Affordable Care Act which, frankly, I would argue has been a disaster,” Duffy said. “I think there’s an opportunity, if this goes down today, that both sides are going to have to work together to say ‘What can we agree on for fixes?'”

NO VOTES:

Here’s how Wisconsin’s House members would have voted on the health care bill

The lone Wisconsin Republican saying he would have cast a vote against the measure is freshman Rep. Mike Gallagher, of the 8th Congressional District.

Gallagher had not said where he stood on the bill, and his office released a statement after Ryan’s announcement that a vote would not be held.

“I had concerns with the bill, including the fact that it did not address the true, underlying drivers of cost in our health care system,” Gallagher said.

He pledged to work toward “patient-centered” reforms in the weeks ahead.

All of the Democrats in Wisconsin’s delegation had pledged to vote against the measure in the House, along with the rest of the minority party.

Here’s how Wisconsin’s House members would have voted on the health care bill

Rep. Mark Pocan, of the 2nd Congressional District, called the process “chaotic” and said he was not surprised that the bill seemed to be headed for failure.

“Going back from my time in legislative leadership in the state Assembly, this is not how you get bills passed, and I think they’re going to find that out today,” Pocan said.

After the vote was pulled from the floor, Pocan called it a “victory for grassroots opposition.”

Here’s how Wisconsin’s House members would have voted on the health care bill

Rep. Ron Kind, of the 3rd Congressional District, said House leadership was “trying to force a bad bill.”

“I hope they use this time to recognize what works in health care and work in a bipartisan manner to fix what doesn’t and lower health care costs for all Americans,” Kind said in a statement.

Here’s how Wisconsin’s House members would have voted on the health care bill

Rep. Gwen Moore, of the 4th Congressional District, said the defeat of the AHCA “underscores the power of civic participation.”

“This decision not only represents a victory for the seniors, children and working- and middle-class Americans who otherwise would have lost their health coverage, but for everyone who exercised their civic duty in opposing such a misguided and dangerous proposal,” she said in a statement.

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