Doctors warn the end of daylight saving time could affect your health

Doctors warn the end of daylight saving time could affect your health
CNN

Eight months of daylight saving time (DST) comes to an end on Nov. 5 at 2 a.m.

This means we will see more light in the morning but less at night.

Adding an extra hour to your sleep schedule seems helpful, but doctors say the change in time could have negative consequences on your body.

“Your usual circadian rhythm gets thrown off and you can be more fatigued and you can feel a little bit more confused and out of it,” said Dr. Diana Flint at SSM Health.

Flint said for those that are sleep deprived, like a majority of the patients she sees, this adds consequences on top of those from lack of sleep.

“You have a decreased ability to focus. Reaction time is much slower. It can be described almost like you’re driving drunk or buzzed,” she said.

Losing an hour of light at night makes for bad visibility while many people are driving home and researchers say it may increase the likelihood of traffic accidents.

Studies also show losing light earlier can trigger winter depression.

To try to get your circadian rhythm back on track, Flint recommends looking at bright lights like your phone screen when you wake up, but not close to when you go to sleep.

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