City leaders applaud Obama’s immigration announcement

Mayor: All Madisonians are assets to the community

More than 200 Madison high school graduates will benefit each year after President Barack Obama’s announcement on immigration, according to Madison city leaders.

Last week, Obama said the government will stop deporting illegal immigrants if they are under the age of 30.

But those immigrants must prove they came to the United States before they turned 16 years old, have not broken the law, and are in school, graduated or joining the military.

City officials said Monday that there is now hope for a better future for Latino youth.

They said many of the problems within that young demographic come about because it’s been difficult for Latinos to foresee a legal future here in Wisconsin.

“They’re accepted in our community and a path for them to have lawful employment allows them to also see their employment rights are being well followed, and also a possible path for education. I think we are all enriched by that,” said Madison City Council President Shiva Bidar Sielaff.

Madison Mayor Paul Soglin said the city will get to keep many of its brightest assets.

“The employers will hire (them) so this is a tremendous boon to our community,” Soglin said. “It’s beneficial to the individuals who are affected, their families, but it’s also a tremendous opportunity (for) our community.

City officials said they will work with local media and youth programs to get the word out.

The city’s Department of Civil Rights and the city website will also have information once it becomes available. 

City leaders applaud Obama’s immigration announcement

Mayor: All Madisonians are assets to the community

More than 200 Madison high school graduates will benefit each year after President Barack Obama’s announcement on immigration, according to Madison city leaders.

Last week, Obama said the government will stop deporting illegal immigrants if they are under the age of 30.

But those immigrants must prove they came to the United States before they turned 16 years old, have not broken the law, and are in school, graduated or joining the military.

City officials said Monday that there is now hope for a better future for Latino youth.

They said many of the problems within that young demographic come about because it’s been difficult for Latinos to foresee a legal future here in Wisconsin.

“They’re accepted in our community and a path for them to have lawful employment allows them to also see their employment rights are being well followed, and also a possible path for education. I think we are all enriched by that,” said Madison City Council President Shiva Bidar Sielaff.

Madison Mayor Paul Soglin said the city will get to keep many of its brightest assets.

“The employers will hire (them) so this is a tremendous boon to our community,” Soglin said. “It’s beneficial to the individuals who are affected, their families, but it’s also a tremendous opportunity (for) our community.

City officials said they will work with local media and youth programs to get the word out.

The city’s Department of Civil Rights and the city website will also have information once it becomes available.