Health

Have a Heart

February is American Heart Month—a great time to read up on the number-one cause of death worldwide

Mission: Possible

Cancer detection and treatment continue to improve—and aid those diagnosed with more effective and efficient disease-fighting tools

Bust the Blues

The advent of winter doesn't only bring chilly temps and shorter days; it can bring an unwelcome visitor with it—depression.

Health Hazards

Too many men refuse to go to the doctor unless they can't stop the bleeding. According to local experts, it's a deadly trend.

Docs With Heart

Dean Foundation's Benevolent Specialists Project is the only free specialist clinic in Wisconsin and works to help the uninsured receive care.

Body of Work

The mind-body-soul connection isn't just some hippy-dippy, far-out notion. Whole-body health is a major focus in women's health care.

Top Dentists 2009

ere's some news to smile about: Madison has a lot of great dentists. How do we know? We asked 'em.

Superstar On and Off the Court

evin Harris has become a superstar. At twenty-six years old, he makes big money, drives cool cars, travels the world as a basketball ambassador (two trips to China this year) and is the face of NBA's New Jersey Nets.

Donation Decision

A woman's life-changing moment leads her on a quest to promote organ donation

Heartily Optimistic

Dropping dead of a heart attack. It may seem like an unpredictable and random strike of lightning, but in most cases that's not how it works.

Doctor.com?

With a dizzying amount of medical information only a mouse click away, the Internet can make us all feel like we're experts. But is this a good thing when it comes to our health?

More Than Skin Deep

It's a sad reason to become friends. But each of us has lost someone we love to a ravaging case of skin cancer known as melanoma.

Catalyst for Change

t's a lofty goal to plan a fundraiser around finding a cure for epilepsy. But it's why we believe in the Madison Friends of CURE— Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy. The local effort is an outpost of CURE's national work, headquartered in Chicago since 1998. And though we're new here, we're already gaining great support. We hope to raise $50,000 in donations to award a research grant in honor of the Madison Friends of CURE.

Natural Healing

hen a patient says, "I can't take it anymore," many doctors may find themselves seriously challenged in the search for an ultimate cure. As a practitioner of integrative health, or "green" medicine, an exclamation like that allows me the perfect opportunity to open the door and offer something new or different medically. We'll assess their mind and body connection and consider if things like acupuncture, meditation or yoga may help aid the patient's quest for health.

Wealth of Health

I'm a colorful character when it comes to my message about the importance of healthy eating. As both a registered and certified dietician, I deal with clients in a variety of situations—some are in preventative care classes, others are clinical or in the hospital and we're working on new diets following surgery; still many are already in the rehabilitation and follow-up portion of their health care. I need to present my ideas and nutrition plans in an open, fun and exciting manner. I find it makes the educational importance of healthy eating easier to "swallow." My interest [in healthy eating] began in high school when I learned I was on the borderline of having an eating disorder. I realized it was important for me to understand the science behind food, and how it impacts and affects the body, before I let food hurt me in a negative way. In the end, my career choice hasn't only allowed me to learn how to practice what I preach in a healthy manner, but it is helping hundreds of others understand nutrition, too. My family knows why we don't eat fast food and how I feel about all of us exercising together. My son realizes if he eats food colored with synthetic dyes he will have an allergic reaction. And whenever I get the chance I work with the media to share my message of health on an even broader scale. It goes back to being that colorful character while talking about why eating your fruits and vegetables is so important! Tammy Fumusa is a registered/certified dietician at St. Mary's Hospital. Look for her blog in the news section at stmarysmadison.com.

Independently Healthy

erved by four hospitals and three major HMOs, Dane County also has an abundance of physicians who've set up their own group practices. Sometimes these doctors strike out on their own simply because they can. "When you have a bunch of nationally prominent physicians who could go anywhere, which you do in Madison," says one industry observer, "you have a bunch of stallions who want to call the shots on everything." Other groups are organized around the type of specialties, such as angioplasties and other types of interventional cardiology, that provide physicians with high reimbursement rates and a steady supply of patients. And still other independent groups are long-standing primary care and family practice groups whose doctors prefer to navigate Dane County's HMO-saturated terrain without losing their autonomy.

Providers Profiled

All Madisonians think they know which doctor is "the best" and which clinic has "the most." But do you want to bet your health on rumors? We've peeked into reputations and exhausted our expert sources to round out these snapshots of the city's major health care providers.

Wealth of Health

I'm a colorful character when it comes to my message about the importance of healthy eating. As both a registered and certified dietician, I deal with clients in a variety of situations—some are in preventative care classes, others are clinical or in the hospital and we're working on new diets following surgery; still many are already in the rehabilitation and follow-up portion of their health care. I need to present my ideas and nutrition plans in an open, fun and exciting manner. I find it makes the educational importance of healthy eating easier to "swallow." My interest [in healthy eating] began in high school when I learned I was on the borderline of having an eating disorder. I realized it was important for me to understand the science behind food, and how it impacts and affects the body, before I let food hurt me in a negative way. In the end, my career choice hasn't only allowed me to learn how to practice what I preach in a healthy manner, but it is helping hundreds of others understand nutrition, too. My family knows why we don't eat fast food and how I feel about all of us exercising together. My son realizes if he eats food colored with synthetic dyes he will have an allergic reaction. And whenever I get the chance I work with the media to share my message of health on an even broader scale. It goes back to being that colorful character while talking about why eating your fruits and vegetables is so important! Tammy Fumusa is a registered/certified dietician at St. Mary's Hospital. Look for her blog in the news section at stmarysmadison.com.

Positively Fit

The owners of Siren Fitness want to take Madison women beyond the workout.

Words to Live By

Lisa Marie Brodsky writes poetry to cope with the loss of her mother to lung cancer.

Up to the Task

A new task force has formed to raise money and awareness for early detection lung cancer screenings.

It's a Jungle in Here

A look into the world of animal research at UW and beyond. Why the debate remains so heated.

A Woman's Intuition

Hazel Tookes's intuition led to an early diagnosis of breast cancer and her trust in God helped her through the treatment.

The Next Step

Dancers can keep up their hobby at any skill and committment level at Dance Fabulous.