MY DESK: MADISON -

The reason I'm picking today's entry is because human nature tends to see an email from an "apple.com" address and give it a little extra credence because it looks authentic.

In this case, there are so many obvious tips that it's false. We've explored many of these in the past: impersonal request for personal information, logging on to another website that's not the company's home page, as well as poor grammar and spelling.

Maybe the most telling component to this email though is that the subject header makes no sense. What does "an chofo daba had test" mean? I thought maybe it some type of technical talk, you know the kind where the IT folks at work explain what's going on with your freezing computer and you nod vigorously to indicate you understand what they're saying when in reality, you have no clue.

I even Google'd the term to see if that was the case (https://www.google.com/#q=an+chofo+daba+had+test).

It's not.

So, the moral of today's Spam Report is this: Even if you get an email from an official sounding address, realize those can be faked, that's not how Apple contacts its customers and if there's gobbledy-gook in the subject header, just hit delete.

Have a great day.

Adam
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From: Support Apple [mailto:Support@apple.com]
Sent: Saturday, November 09, 2013 10:00 AM
Subject: an chofo daba had test


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