MINNEAPOLIS -- The Milwaukee Brewers made history during the first round of the 2014 draft by selecting Hawaiian high school pitcher Kodi Medeiros.

By selecting Medeiros No. 12 overall, they made him the highest drafted left-handed hurler in team history. Medeiros also became the first Hawaiian prep player selected in the first two rounds of the draft since 2001, when both Bronson Sardinha and Brandon League were picked in the first two rounds. Medeiros also became the highest-ever native Hawaiian to be drafted.

"It means a lot to Hawaii, to my family, to my friends that help me out as well as my advisor," Medeiros said. "All the time and effort they put into me, I took that and I just wanted to make everyone proud. I just want Hawaii to be on the map, and I want scouts to know that Hawaii has talent."

A Pepperdine recruit, the Brewers were blown away by Medeiros in a pre-draft workout at Miller Park in which his fastball reportedly touched 97 mph. He has consistently hit the mid-90s with the fastball and has an above-average slider and changeup that he also mixes in.

"Our scouts out there, Josh Belovsky and Corey Rodriguez, and I have seen this kid throughout last summer. He just came here and emphasized that he was a guy we were really high on," said Brewers Scouting Director Bruce Seid. "No one ever said the workout was the end-all. But it certainly was the exclamation point."

Medeiros said he models his game after San Francisco Giants starter Madison Bumgarner and Chicago White Sox lefty Chris Sale. His low-angle delivery adds movement to his off-speed stuff, keeping hitters off balance.

"I like the slot I throw from," Medeiros said. "I've got good deception on the slot and my (velocity) is still up there even when I throw from that slot, so that's why I do it. I'm comfortable throwing from that slot."

With their competitive balance selection, No. 41 overall, the Brewers selected shortstop Jacob Gatewood from Clovis High School in California. A Southern Cal recruit, Gatewood has requisite arm to stay at short, but at 6-foot-5, could move over to third if he continues to add bulk to his now-wiry 190-pound frame.

Where Gatewood will make his money is at the plate, where he has some of the best raw power of any prospect in the draft.

"The bat has a chance to be a really good bat," Seid said. "It's a ways to go, but all of the ingredients are there."

In the second round, Milwaukee selected Missouri high school outfielder Monte Harrison. A 6-foot-3, 200-pound athlete from Lee's Summit, Mo., Harrison has committed to the University of Nebraska to play both baseball and football.

"When a guy plays multiple sports, you can see the athleticism," Seid said. "Hitting a baseball is probably the hardest thing to do in any sport. But with his athleticism and the things he can do, it's definitely worth giving the opportunity."