At least 28 Palestinian children have lost their lives in the recent fighting, and others are beginning to show signs of mental distress, said Catherine Weibel, communications chief for the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF).

Israel says, as of Saturday, its military has attacked 1,220 "terror targets," including 632 launchers, 130 military camps, 106 "terror infrastructure" and 220 tunnels.

That level of specificity has little meaning in Gaza, where a public utility official told CNN that water, not terror, infrastructure has been hit.

Two Gaza water wells took direct hits Saturday, Gaza director of public water Maher Salem said. These water sources, which supply water to 27,000 people, "no longer exist," he said.

No de-escalation

Though some Israelis have been wounded, none have been killed by the hundreds of rockets fired by Hamas and other militant groups in Gaza. Israel's Iron Dome defense system has intercepted dozens of rockets, helping keep fatalities at bay.

Hostilities between the two sides escalated this month after the killing of three Israeli teenagers and a Palestinian teen. Neither Hamas nor Israel appear to be backing down, prompting fears of a ground invasion by the latter.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu left all possibilities open, saying the international community will not influence his actions against Hamas. He reiterated that there is one path to a cease-fire: the cessation of attacks from Gaza.

The language seems clear -- each side demands the other to stop -- but it seems the two sides can't hear each other while they have their hands pressed on the "launch" button.

In another incident Saturday, an Israeli airstrike killed six Palestinians in Gaza City, according to local medical sources.

An Israeli airstrike hit a group of people near Khan Younis, killing a young girl and injuring five others, according to medical and security sources in Gaza.

Attackers in Gaza opened fire and damaged an IDF vehicle patrolling the security fence in northern Gaza, the IDF said.

What's next?

On Saturday, not all of the rockets fired from Gaza landed in Israel. At least two rockets hit open areas in the West Bank.

The IDF reported that it has called up more than 35,600 reservists. They are authorized to call up to 40,000.

As concerns of a ground invasion by Israeli forces grow, foreigners in Gaza are planning their exit.

One of the only crossing points between Israel and Gaza, at Erez, has received about 800 requests by civilians with foreign citizenship to leave, officials there told CNN.

The 800 requests have come in over the past three days and have been approved, a crossing official said. That figure includes about 300 Americans, though that number is unofficial, the source said.

Medical sources described overcrowded emergency rooms in Gaza and dwindling stocks of medicine, a situation that mirrored Syrian hospitals at the height of its civil war.

At one damaged hospital, eight activists formed a human shield in an attempt to protect it.

The activists who formed a human shield are from various countries, including the United States, Venezuela, Belgium, Britain and Switzerland, said Dr. Basman Al-Ashi, executive director of the Al-Wafa hospital. He said the hospital caters to patients who need 24-hour care, and thus cannot evacuate them.

Hamas and other militant groups in Gaza are believed to have about 10,000 rockets of varying ranges, according to the Israeli military. Israel has said some 3.5 million residents live in areas within reach of the rockets.