MADISON, Wis. -

A second group filed paperwork with state election officials on Friday aiming to seek out Republicans and independents in the effort to recall Gov. Scott Walker.

The Walker Recall PAC's treasurer, Randy Bryce, of Racine, delivered the papers to the Government Accountability Board late Friday. It's the second group to start a serious effort against the governor, behind United Wisconsin, which filed Tuesday.

Bryce, a union ironworker, said his group will seek signatures from independents and Republicans who are upset with the governor.

"We're specifically targeting independents," he said. "There are Republicans who have changed their minds since they last cast a ballot, and we're going to be reaching out to those people -- people whose doors aren't knocked on."

United Wisconsin has gathered signatures from independents and Republicans, spokeswoman Meagan Mahaffey said.

"We've got a lot of those," she said, declining to provide specifics. "There's a lot of people who are upset with Walker who are independents. There are a lot of Republicans who are upset with Walker and are working with United Wisconsin."

The group said Thursday it had collected about 50,000 signatures in the first two days of the recall effort. It needs 540,208 valid signatures by Jan. 17, but leaders have said they will seek many more as a safety net.

Bryce said his small group will not be able to gather hundreds of thousands of signatures itself, but said he hoped to collaborate with United Wisconsin.

"I can't see why we wouldn't," he said. "If they don't have enough and they need some more, well, here you go. It's kind of like an insurance policy."

The group held a recall rally Friday at the Barrymore Theater in Madison to raise money for its petition drive. Government should answer to the working people, Bryce said as his reason for joining the recall effort.

Walker Recall PAC also submitted papers against Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch.

Mahaffey of United Wisconsin said her group will attempt to coordinate the various groups soliciting petition signatures across the state.

"We need to figure out the best strategy for who's talking to what groups of people to get them to sign," Mahaffey said. "Time's ticking for everybody who's doing recall work right now."