8. Leave political items at home: Voters are asked not to wear political clothing or paraphernalia to the polling place on Election Day. The chief election inspector may ask voters to leave the polling place if they are judged to be electioneering or creating a disturbance.

9. Get in line before the polls close: Voters standing in line waiting to vote when the polling place closes at 8 p.m. on Election Day will be permitted to vote.

10. Rules for challenging a voter: There are specific criteria and limitations on challenging a person's eligibility to vote. The chief election inspector can explain the challenge process and provide the voter and the challenger with explanatory documents. 

WHO IS FACING RECALL AND WHO ARE THE CHALLENGERS?

Republican Gov. Scott Walker is facing a recall election. Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett won the Democratic primary and will face Walker in the recall election.

Republican Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch is also facing a recall election. Democrat Mahlon Mitchell, a Madison firefighter and the leader of the statewide firefighters' union, is running against Kleefisch.

Kleefisch and Walker will appear separately on the ballot for the recall election. That means the recalls could give the state a governor and lieutenant governor from opposing parties.

Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald, R-Juneau, is facing a recall election. His Democratic challenger is Lori Compas, a photographer from Fort Atkinson.

Republican Sen. Terry Moulton of Chippewa Falls is facing a recall election. Former state Rep. Kristen Dexter, an Eau Claire Democrat, is running against Moulton in the recall election.

Republican Sen. Van Wanggaard of Racine is facing a recall election. Former state Sen. John Lehman, a Racine Democrat, is running against Wanggaard.

Republican Sen. Pam Galloway of Wausau was facing a recall election but announced she is resigning from office, citing illnesses in her family. State Rep. Jerry Petrowski, a Marathon Republican, is running for Galloway's open Senate seat in this spring's recalls. State Rep. Donna Seidel, a Wausau Democrat, will face Petrowski in the race for the open Senate seat.

WHEN WOULD CANDIDATES WHO LOSE RECALL ELECTIONS LEAVE OFFICE?

Losers could get up to two-and-a-half weeks to leave their jobs and winners will serve until after regular elections roll around again in 2014.  

WHAT DO I NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE NEW VOTER ID LAW?

Wisconsin's new voter ID law requires that voters show approved photo ID at the polls, beginning with the Spring Primary in February of 2012.

But the voter ID law likely won't be in effect for the recall elections after judges issued orders in two cases blocking the law. Wisconsin's Department of Justice has appealed the injunctions.

Wisconsin law requires the Department of Transportation to provide free ID cards to any individual who will be at least 18 years of age on the date of the next election and who requests a free ID for the purpose of voting. The regular fee is $28.

For information about getting a state identification card, visit the DOT's website at http://www.dot.wisconsin.gov/drivers/drivers/apply/idcard.htm.

More information outlining the voter ID law can be found here: http://gab.wi.gov/sites/default/files/publication/137/voter_photo_id_law_9_7_11_pdf_19983.pdf.

HOW DO I KNOW THAT A PETITION IS LEGITIMATE AND WILL BE TURNED IN TO THE GAB?

According to the Government Accountability Board, the responsibility is on the circulator to submit any signatures they collect on a recall petition.

"If they are collecting signatures, those signatures are not their property and they must be turned in on penalty of law," said Kevin Kennedy, GAB director.

WHAT HAPPENS IF PETITIONS AREN'T TURNED IN, OR ARE DESTROYED?

The GAB reminds that election fraud, including destroying or not turning in circulated petitions, is a Class I Felony, punishable by up to 3.5 years in prison and a $10,000 fine.

WHERE CAN PETITIONS BE CIRCULATED?