Officer punished for using database to contact woman

Officer cited, suspended 2 days

Published On: Mar 25 2013 04:01:55 PM CDT   Updated On: Mar 25 2013 07:20:12 PM CDT
Johnnie Diamante
MADISON, Wis. -

A University of Wisconsin police officer is back on the job after a two-day suspension without pay resulting from an investigation into the use of a law enforcement database to look up the name of a woman he saw at a grocery store.

According to UW police, Capt. Johnnie Diamante admitted to using the Wisconsin Department of Justice information database to locate a woman he saw at an Aldi's store and placing a Valentine's Day card on her car.

Diamante told Madison police he noticed the woman at Aldi's on Feb. 11 and used the database to look up the woman's address from license plate information.

According to police records, Diamante said the woman smiled at him as he walked into the store and they said hi to each other.

Diamante originally told investigators he got the woman's name off of her debit card as they were checking out of the store, but later admitted he got her name and address by looking up her license plate information using the DOJ database.

The woman said she was upset when she found the Valentine's Day card on her car parked at her home. She contacted police to report a stalking incident.

The card invited the woman to meet the man at the Aldi's on Lien Road the next day. Police said officers accompanied her to meet the man.

Diamante was cited on suspicion of disorderly conduct.

According to the Department of Justice, police officers sign an agreement not to use their resources for non-work related matters.

"Every police officer is trained not to use the system in that way. It happens very seldom even across the state," said Capt. Steven Rogers with the UW Police Department.

Rogers said Diamante has never been disciplined by the department in the past.

"It's unique for him, as he's got an exemplary record since 1997 in working here. It's also extremely uncommon for anybody in our department to do that," Rogers said.

According to police records, Diamante apologized, telling investigators he understands why the woman involved was upset and agreed not to contact her again.

WISC-TV reached out to Diamante but the emails weren't returned.