MADISON, Wis. -

American Family Insurance got almost 1,000 damage claims after Monday's storm, and as those numbers increase, scammers see easy targets.

Golf ball-sized hail from Monday's storm not only caused damage to properties, but it can also put a dent in people's pocket books.

"In Wisconsin we get very volatile weather. We get rain storms, tornadoes, wind storms and hail, like we saw this week, which was pretty intense. Any of those could be reasons for someone to sweep in and cause a problem," said Jerad Albrach, senior communications specialist.

Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection officials said many times those who come to your door to offer help may not be who they say they are.

"We always want people to look out for any kind of traveling sales crew, work crews that come to your door or anyone who doesn’t seem to take no for an answer and look for any reason to get into the home or onto the property. Those are all red flags that you may have a potential scammer or a questionable business on your hands," Albrach said.

Those scammers are called "storm chasers," and there's a law named after them to prevent insurance fraud. The law prevents contractors from promising to pay insurance deductibles, negotiating with your insurer, it also allows customers three days to cancel the contract if your insurance denies the claim.

"We just try to give the best product out there. We don’t say we were going to go out and do your roof in one day, we are going to put more care into it," said Zach Kirner, vice president of Southern Wisconsin Roofing Company.

If you're in the market for roof repairs, Kierner's best advice to protect your investment is to choose a local company, don’t rush the process, and make sure your repairs are done right the first time.

"Making sure it’s a company that’s been around, that’s local, licensed, bonded and insured in the area because if anything were to happen down the road, you don’t want them to be out of town or you can't find them because they are in Texas or use a new name," he said.