Opinion

Probation should not be revoked without conviction of new crime

Probation should not be revoked without conviction of new crime

Every year the Wisconsin Department of Corrections revokes the probation or parole of 3,000 former inmates who go back to prison even though they have not been convicted of a new crime.

What they've done is violated a rule…perhaps taken a job without prior approval, or purchased a cellphone without getting it OK'd. So back they go for, on average, a year and a half. The cost in both dollars and human lives is steep and unnecessary and unjust.

A new report details the health impact of these "crimeless revocations," including housing and employment loss, stress and stigma suffered not just by the offender but by their families.

A new movement is forming to reform revocation practices which, no surprise, disproportionately affect people of color.

There's a community forum to discuss the new report Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at First Congregational United Church of Christ.

We're on board. It's a response to disparities and criminal IN-justice. There should be no time without a crime.


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